Welcome to Beringer
established 1876
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Beringer

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Alongside Beringer's dedication to world-class wine is our passion for culinary development and excellence. From developing and mentoring some of America's great culinary talents to tending to our onsite vegetable garden, we ensure the food we produce is of the utmost in quality and nutrition. Our culinary center, the Hudson House, was the original residence on the Beringer Brothers' property. From 1990-2000 it was home to the School for American Chefs, an exclusive school for professional chefs taught by famous author and food personality Madeleine Kamman. Beringer has been honored to host a number of culinary luminaries in the kitchen and dining room, including Julia Child, Charlie Trotter, Hiro Sone, Bradley Ogden and Thomas Keller.  

Below you will find some of our favorite recipes that you can pair with Beringer wines.

 

  Wine and Food Pairing Tips 

Food and wine are natural companions, each bringing out the nuances of flavor in the other. And while some would suggest that specific wines should be had with specific dishes, at Beringer we believe that you should find your own preferences, while offering some guiding principles.

Salt

Salty taste in foods such as soy sauce, fish sauce, and olives will make your wine taste milder or fruitier, less bitter and tannic.

Sour 

Sour taste in foods such as lemon, vinegar, or dry wine reductions will also make your wine taste milder or fruitier, less bitter and tannic.

Sweet 

Sweet taste in foods such as sugar, fruit, and honey will make your wine taste stronger or less fruity. The wine will display more acid, bitterness, and tannins.

Savory

Savory taste in food (Umami) such as meat, seafood, poultry, tomatoes, and soup stocks will make your wine taste stronger or less fruity. The wine will display more acid, bitterness, and tannins.

Spicy 

Spicy influence in foods such as black pepper and jalapeño peppers will make your wine taste stronger. It will exaggerate the tannins and bitterness of the wine.

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